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Wednesday
Sep062017

R U OK?Day Thursday, 14th September 2017

R U OK?

The national suicide prevention charity, R U OK? was founded by Gavin Larkin in collaboration with Janina Nearn after the suicide death of Gavin’s father, Barry Larkin, in 1995.

R U OK?’s vision is to have a world where each and every person is connected with others, and all are protected from suicide.

This year, R U OK?Day is being held on Thursday 14th of September. R U OK?Day is a dedicated day to reminding everyone that we are all able to ask “are you okay” and that we have what it takes to support those struggling with life.

What is the R U OK? cause?

R U OK? seeks to have people meaningfully connect with one another, in order to find out who needs help and to support those needing it through their struggles.

Mission: “Our mission is to inspire and empower everyone to meaningfully connect with people around them and support anyone struggling with life”

R U OK? Goals:

“Our goals are to:

1.   Boost our confidence to meaningfully connect and ask about life’s ups and downs

2.   Nurture our sense of responsibility to regularly connect and support others

3.   Strengthen our sense of belonging because we know people are there for us

4.   Be relevant, strong, and dynamic”

More information on R U OK? and its founders can be found by clicking on the below links.

R U OK? Home:
          https://www.ruok.org.au/

R U OK? What We’re About:
          https://www.ruok.org.au/what-were-about

R U OK? Our Story:
          https://www.ruok.org.au/our-story

How do I know if someone needs support?

Over the last fortnight, have you noticed two or more of the below in any individual around you? If so, that person might need some extra support.

1.      Changes in their physical appearance?

  •        Look more tired than usual
  •        Seem “flat” or drained of energy
  •        Have had a pattern of illness or being constantly run down
  •        Are complaining of physical health issues such as headaches or migraines
  •        Are eating much more or much less than usual
  •        Are drinking more alcohol than usual
  •        Seem more fidgety and nervous than usual

2.      Changes in mood?

  •        Seem more irritable, snappy and fly off the handle when they didn’t use to
  •        Appear more anxious and worried about everything (i.e. work and personal things)
  •        React more emotionally than the situation deserves
  •        Are quick to anger
  •        Appear to be overwhelmed by tasks that they had previously found manageable

3.      Changes in behaviour?

  •        Seem more withdrawn than usual
  •        Don’t seem to enjoy hobbies/interests like they use to
  •        Seem to have difficulty concentrating or seem constantly distracted
  •        Are taking on more work to avoid being social situations with others
  •        Are not performing to their usual standard

4.      Changes in how thoughts are expressed?

  •        Communicate a tendency to catastrophise everything “It’s always terrible…”
  •      Seem to interpret situations negatively (e.g. they might conclude that two people in a        meeting at work are discussing their performance or future with the company)
  •        Personalise situations (e.g. “I knew I’d get the toughest roster – they have it in for me”)
  •        Have thoughts that sound more confused or irrational
  •        Are complaining about constant thoughts and difficulty in switching them off

How do I ask R U OK?

Getting ready to ask:

1.      Be ready

2.      Be prepared

3.      Pick your moment

For more information on the three steps to asking R U OK? click the following link:
          https://www.ruok.org.au/how-to-ask

Starting a conversation:

 1.     Ask ‘R U OK?’

2.      Listen without judgement

3.      Encourage action

4.      Follow up

For more information on how to start a conversation, please click on the following link:
          https://www.ruok.org.au/how-to-ask 

R U OK?

If you notice anyone around you who may look as though they are not having a good day, looking upset, ask them, R U OK? It doesn’t matter whether the person is in your friendship or family circles, or just happen to be physically near you, the simplest gesture of asking R U OK? may be their ticket to seeking help, or feeling as though they have support to get through their struggles.

A point to remember is that when some people feel down, they may not show this in their facial expressions. Some people prefer to put on a happy face rather than let others know that they may not be feeling so well. Due to this, it is important that we ask others around us R U OK?, regardless of their facial expressions.

What is less confusing than the above? Ask those around you R U OK? Strike up a simple conversation and ask your peers how they are doing. It’s possible that maybe they will ask you the same question. It is a good idea to ask people this question not only on R U OK? Day, but all year round.

What do I do if someone tells me that they are NOT OK?

What to do is dependent on your peer’s unique situation, but generally you should encourage your peer to seek help. Sometimes, the conversation may be bigger or more involved than what you may be equipped to deal with. Encouragement to seek an appointment with their regular GP or with their local mental health team is a good start to returning to a positive mental state.

Should your peer reveal that they have a life-threatening emergency, or that they or another person may be in imminent risk of harm to themselves or others, you should call Triple Zero, 000.

***If you or another require urgent medical attention, or if you or another are in imminent risk of harm to yourself or others, you should call Triple Zero, 000 immediately.***

There are also other numbers available to call should the emergency is not life threatening. If your regular psychologist has not stated that they are available for emergency calls, you may want to familiarise yourself with the below numbers.

The below numbers are sourced from the Australian Government Mental Health Commission website. You can access the site and more organisations by clicking on the following links: 

          http://www.mentalhealthcommission.gov.au/get-help.aspx

          https://metrosouth.health.qld.gov.au/acute-mental-health-care

 

Emergency 000

Mental Health Organisations

1800 Respect

1800 737 732

Sexual Assault
Domestic and Family Violence

Beyond Blue

1300 224 636

Depression,
Anxiety, and related

eheadspace

1800 650 890

Ages 12 - 25

Kids Help Line

1800 55 1800

Ages 5 to 25

Lifeline

13 11 14

Crisis and suicide prevention and support

Mensline

1300 78 99 78

Men with family and relationship concerns

QLD Crisis Line

13 432 584
(13 HEALTH)

QLD Mental Health Crisis Line

QLIFE

1800 184 527

Support for LGBTIQ

Suicide Call Back Service

1300 659 467

People affected by, or contemplating suicide

Hospitals

Logan Hospital

1300 642 255
(1300 MH CALL)

Acute Mental Health Services

The Prince Charles Hospital

1800 112 403

Acute Mental Health Services

Princess Alexandra Hospital

1300 642 255
(1300 MH CALL)

Acute Mental Health Services

Redland Hospital

1300 642 255
(1300 MH CALL)

Acute Mental Health Services

Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital

1300 642 255

Acute Mental Health Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday
Aug032016

Autism

What is Autism?

                Autism, correctly known as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), is a lifelong developmental condition which typically affects the way in which an individual relates to people, and his or her environment. Autism Spectrum Australia states approximately one in 100 individuals are living with ASD and nearly four times as many males are affected as females. Children can often be identified as living with ASD from around the age of two years but less severe cases may not be detected until much later in childhood, or even adulthood.

                ‘Spectrum’ refers to the way that ASD presents itself differently in each individual, as both challenges and abilities. As the degree to which individuals are affected, an individual living with ASD may not present with noticeable symptoms and may live a relatively normal life, whilst others may require ongoing care and support.

                Autism Spectrum Australia lists social communication, social interaction, and restricted or repetitive behaviours and interest as the main areas affected by ASD.

So what does this mean?

                An individual living with ASD may lack non-verbal communication, or lack the ability to register others non-verbals. They may not engage in regular eye contact when speaking with others, and they may not respond emotionally or register their own or others emotions which can affect both peer and family relationships.

                Autism Awareness states those living with ASD may excessively adhere to routines or patterns and can become distressed when these routines change. An affected individual may have an increased or decreased sensitivity and reactivity to sensory input, such as hearing a sound as louder than an unaffected individual may, or not responding to the sound at all. Affected individuals may encounter significant learning difficulties throughout their lifetime, but many also have skills which enable them to succeed past the norm.

Who can I contact for more information and support?

          There are many Australia-wide and Queensland-based establishments dedicated to providing information and support for individuals and families of those living with ASD.

Autism Awareness is a non-Government organisation (NGO) which seeks to empower parents and carers with information and resources, and provide educational programs to families, businesses, and the general public. They are a member of the United Nations Department of Public Information and have presented at various global conferences.

-          http://www.autismawareness.com.au/

Autism Queensland is “a community based organisation dedicated to creating a life of participation , opportunity  and choice for  people living with ASD.”

-          https://autismqld.com.au/page/home

Queensland Government

-          https://www.qld.gov.au/disability/community/autism/

Raising Children.net.au

-          http://raisingchildren.net.au/state_pages/qld_support_post-diagnosis_asd.html

Wednesday
Jun082016

Men’s Health Week - 13th to 19th June, 2016

June 13th signifies the beginning of Men’s Health Week - why is this important to know?

Men’s Health Week seeks to bring awareness to issues that specifically relate to men, or have more of an impact on men. According to the Australian Government’s website for the National Mental Health Commission, up to five times as many men as females take their own lives every year; men are also more at risk from social violence than most other social groups.

If you, or a male you know, is experiencing mental health difficulties or needs assistance, the following numbers are dedicated to helping men throughout difficult times.

Support Groups

Contact Number

Availability

Beyond Blue

1300 224 636

24/7

Dad’s in Distress

1300 853 437

Mon - Fri, 9am to 5pm

Lifeline

13 11 14

24/7

Men’s Line Australia

1300 78 99 78

24/7

Man Therapy (Beyond Blue)

1300 222 638

24/7

Suicide Call Back Service

1300 659 467

24/7

 

This year’s theme is ‘Health Elements: Living with Purpose - Building on Health’. Health is not defined by the absence of problems or issues we face, but through prosperity. Often finding a purpose in life is an integral part in becoming and remaining healthy.

Men’s Health Week encourages communities to reach out to men and boys alike and promote health and well-being through activities, events and promotions.

For a list of activities on offer in Queensland, click on the following link:
http://www.menshealthweek.org.au/En/Categories/5.aspx

For more information about Men’s Health Week, click on the link below:
http://www.menshealthweek.org.au/En/Default.aspx

Wednesday
May042016

Do you know who to call in an emergency involving mental health?

We all know who to call in an emergency involving a car accident or a fire, but many people do not know whom to call when an emergency involves mental health.

You are still able to call Triple Zero (000) if you have an emergency involving mental health where your or another person’s life is at imminent risk.

There are also other numbers available to call should emergency services be delayed in responding, or if there is an emergency that is not life threatening.  These numbers SHOULD NOT replace calling Triple 000 if you or another person requires urgent medical attention or is at risk to self or others.

If your regular psychologist has not stated that they are available for emergency calls, you may want to familiarise yourself with the below numbers.

The below numbers are sourced from the Australian Government Mental Health Commission website. You can access the site and more organisations by clicking on the following links: 

-          http://www.mentalhealthcommission.gov.au/get-help.aspx

-          https://metrosouth.health.qld.gov.au/acute-mental-health-care

 

Mental Health Contact Numbers:

 

 Emergency

   000

1800 Respect

1800 737 732

Sexual Assault
Domestic and Family Violence

Beyond Blue

1300 224 636

Depression,
Anxiety, and related

eheadspace

1800 650 890

Ages 12 - 25

Kids Help Line

1800 55 1800

Ages 5 to 25

Lifeline

13 11 14

Crisis and suicide prevention and support

Mensline

1300 78 99 78

Men with family and relationship concerns

QLD Crisis Line

13 432 584
(13 HEALTH)

QLD Mental Health Crisis Line

QLIFE

1800 184 527

Support for LGBTIQ

Suicide Call Back Service

1300 659 467

People affected by, or contemplating suicide

Hospitals

 

 

Logan Hospital

1300 642 255
(1300 MH CALL)

Acute Mental Health Services

The Prince Charles Hospital

1800 112 403

Acute Mental Health Services

Princess Alexandra Hospital

1300 642 255
(1300 MH CALL)

Acute Mental Health Services

Redland Hospital

1300 642 255
(1300 MH CALL)

Acute Mental Health Services

Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital

1300 642 255
(1300 MH CALL)

Acute Mental Health Services

Emergency

   000

1800 Respect

1800 737 732

Sexual Assault
Domestic and Family Violence

Beyond Blue

1300 224 636

Depression,
Anxiety, and related

Kids Help Line

1800 55 1800

Ages 5 to 25

eheadspace

1800 650 890

Ages 12 - 25

Lifeline

13 11 14

Crisis and suicide prevention and support

Mensline

1300 78 99 78

Men with family and relationship concerns

QLD Crisis Line

13 432 584
(13 HEALTH)

QLD Mental Health Crisis Line

QLIFE

1800 184 527

Support for LGBTIQ

Suicide Call Back Service

1300 659 467

People affected by, or contemplating suicide

Tuesday
Apr122016

Do you want to come in for a session with your psychologist but are unsure if you can afford it?

Often clients will receive a Mental Health Care Plan (MHCP) from their General Practitioner (GP) which allows them to receive a Medicare rebate of up to $84.80 (prices subject to change) for up to 10 sessions per calendar year with a psychologist.

Many clients may feel that they will be unable to afford to continue seeing their psychologist once their MHCP has been claimed in full.

Did you know that after January 1st of the new calendar year, you are able to revisit your GP and discuss your options about obtaining a new MHCP?

Once you have your new MHCP, you can simply call your regular psychologist and book in for a new appointment.

Also, if you are unsure of how many sessions you have left on your current MHCP, simply call the office and reception will be happy to find out for you.

Saturday
Oct032015

World Mental Health Day - 10th October, 2015

There are a number of events in October, being Mental Health Awareness Month; October 4, 2015 to October 11, 2015 is Mental Health Week and October 10th is World Mental Health Day.

This years theme for World Mental Health Day is “dignity in mental health”.

The aim is to “raise awareness of what can be done to ensure that people with mental health conditions can continue to live with dignity, through human rights oriented policy and law, training of health professionals, respect for informed consent to treatment, inclusion in decision-making processes, and public information campaigns.” (WHO, 2015)

More information can be obtained directly from the following webpages.

World Mental Health Day 2015 (WHO, 2015)
http://www.who.int/mental_health/world-mental-health-day/2015/en/

World Mental Health Day 2015: Dignity in Mental Health Information Sheet (WHO, 2015)
http://www.who.int/mental_health/world-mental-health-day/infosheet_wmhd2015.pdf?ua=1

Mental Health Australia
http://mhaustralia.org/media-releases/media-alert-world-mental-health-day-10-october-2015

 

Saturday
Oct032015

Mental Health Week - 4th to 11th October, 2015

There are a number of events in October, being Mental Health Awareness Month; October 4, 2015 to October 11, 2015 is Mental Health Week and October 10th is World Mental Health Day.

Mental Health Week aims to highlight involve the community in issues surrounding mental health care, educate in order to help improve mental health care, and minimise stigma and discrimination.

This years theme is “value mental health”. How do you value mental health?

More information can be obtained directly from the below websites.

Queensland Mental Health Week
http://www.qldmentalhealthweek.org.au/

Mental Health Australia
http://mhaustralia.org/

Western Australian Association for Mental Health
http://mhw.waamh.org.au/ 

Saturday
Oct032015

Mental Health Awareness Month - October, 2015

There are a number of events in October, being Mental Health Awareness Month; October 4, 2015 to October 11, 2015 is Mental Health Week and October 10th is World Mental Health Day.

The 2015 Mental Health Month Theme has been announced as “Value Your Mind”, by the Mental Health Association. 

The main message the Mental Health Association wish to convey with this campaign is to encourage all individuals to:

“think about how mental health exists in their daily life & promote the need for all individuals to make mental health a priority in their daily lives. When we make our mental health a priority, we are practicing self - care which is an important part of our daily living to ensure the maintenance of a balanced wellbeing.”

More information on Mental Health Month can be obtained directly from the Mental Health Awareness web page. http://www.mentalhealth.asn.au/programs/mental-health-month-nsw